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Month: December 2016

Film Friday- Azumanga Daioh

Film Friday- Azumanga Daioh

A television anime adaptation titled Azumanga Daioh: the Animation was produced by J.C.Staff and aired in Japan between April and September 2002, consisting of 130 five-minute segments compiled into 26 episodes. The compiled episodes were released on DVD and Universal Media Discs (UMDs) by Starchild Records, and an English-language version was produced by ADV Films. Prior to the series, a theatrical short and an original net animation were also produced. Several soundtrack albums were released, as well as three Azumanga Daioh video games.

Anime

The anime television series, Azumanga Daioh: the Animation, was produced by J.C.Staff and aired from the week of April 8, 2002 until the week of September 30, 2002. It was broadcast on TV Tokyo, TV Aichi, TV Osaka, and AT-X in five-minute segments every weekday, then repeated as a 25-minute compilation that weekend, for a total of 130 five-minute segments collected in 26 episodes. For the compilation episodes, the respective opening and ending themes were “Soramimi Cake” (Cake of Mishearing) and “Raspberry Heaven”, both performed by Oranges & Lemons. The compilation episodes, which were the only versions to include the title and credits sequences, were released on 6 DVDs in 2003 and 9 Universal Media Discs between 2005 and 2006 by Starchild Records, and a DVD box set of all episodes was released on June 24, 2009; the five-minute segments can be distinguished by their individual titles.

Besides the anime television series, there have been two other animated adaptations: The Very Short Azumanga Daioh Movie, a six-minute trailer released to movie theaters to publicize the upcoming television series, and Azumanga Web Daioh, a shorter original net animation made available for paid streaming on chara-ani.com beginning from December 28, 2000, then offered as a paid download for a limited time. Azumanga Web Daioh was originally intended to gauge whether there was enough interest to create a web-released anime adaptation; because of overwhelming demand, the original plan for web-release was changed to a television release. It featured different voice actors and music from the regular series.

In the United States, the anime television series was released in six DVDs on September 9, 2005, and then later in a five DVD volume “Thinpak” set, both by ADV Films. The sixth DVD volume included The Very Short Azumanga Daioh Movie. In 2009, Nokia offered the first five episodes of Azumanga Daioh on its Ovi phone service. Madman Entertainment licensed the series for release in Australia and New Zealand. As of September 1, 2009, all of ADV’s former catalog are transferred to AEsir Holdings, with distribution from Section23 Films. The series was later re-licensed in 2016 by Sentai Filmworks.

Wednesday News- December 28, 2016

Wednesday News- December 28, 2016

News-

Isuzu Shibata’s Mawaru Penguindrum Manga Ends in January- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-12-27/isuzu-shibata-mawaru-penguindrum-manga-ends-in-january/.110385

Welcome to the Ballroom Manga Get TV Anime- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-12-28/welcome-to-the-ballroom-manga-get-tv-anime/.110413

The 2016 Year in Review- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/shelf-life/2016-12-26/.110301

Anime-

  • Aria the Scarlet Ammo BD/DVD S.A.V.E. Edition
  • Kizumonogatari Part 1: Tekketsu BD
  • Mobile Suit Gundam Thunderbolt: December Sky 4K Ultra HD BD (Import)A
  • Sengoku Basara – Samurai Kings: The Last Party Movie BD/DVD S.A.V.E. Edition
  • Sengoku Basara – Samurai Kings Seasons 1 + 2 + OVA BD/DVD S.A.V.E. Edition
  • Sengoku Basara: End of Judgement Season 3 BD/DVD

Manga-

  • Astro Boy Omnibus GN 6
  • Attack on Titan GN 20
  • Attack on Titan GN 20 Special Edition with DVD
  • The Black Museum: The Ghost and The Lady GN 2 (Hardcover)
  • Blade of the Immortal Omnibus GN 1
  • Cells at Work! GN 2
  • D-Frag! GN 10
  • LDK GN 8
  • Mysterious Girlfriend X GN 4
  • Not Lives GN 4
  • Pandora in the Crimson Shell: Ghost Urn GN 6
  • The Seven Princes of the Thousand Year Labyrinth GN 1
  • Vinland Saga GN 8 (Hardcover)
  • Your Lie in April GN 11

Manga Monday- Azumanga Daioh

Manga Monday- Azumanga Daioh

Azumanga Daioh is a Japanese yonkoma comedy manga series written and illustrated by Kiyohiko Azuma, which was serialized in MediaWorks’ Dengeki Daioh magazine between 1999 and 2002. Three additional chapters were published in Shogakukan’s Monthly Shōnen Sunday in May 2009 to celebrate the manga’s tenth anniversary. The manga was first released in English by ADV Manga, and was later re-issued by Yen Press.

Both the manga and anime have been praised for their humor driven by eccentric characters, with Azuma acclaimed as a “master of the four-panel form” for both his art style and comic timing.

The series title has no particular significance to the story. “Azumanga” is a portmanteau of the author’s name “Azuma” and “manga”, while “Daioh” comes from the magazine in which it was originally published, Dengeki Daioh. In the anime, “daioh” is mentioned during the next episode previews, used in context with the meaning “great king”.

Azumanga Daioh was written and illustrated by Kiyohiko Azuma, largely in yonkoma (four-panel) format. The unnumbered chapters were serialized by MediaWorks’ in the monthly magazine Dengeki Daioh from February 1999 to May 2002. The series was collected in four tankōbon volumes. Each of the four volumes covers about a year in the characters’ lives. A new edition in three volumes was released in Japan by Shogakukan to commemorate the manga’s 10th anniversary, with volume one, covering the first year of high school, being published June 11, 2009. The reprint edition contains three additional 16-page chapters serialized in Monthly Shōnen Sunday starting in May 2009 under the title Azumanga Daioh: Supplementary Lessons (あずまんが大王·補習編 Azumanga Daiō Hoshūhen?).

The series was licensed in English in North America and the United Kingdom by ADV Manga, which released all four volumes between 2003 and 2004. ADV later reprinted the series in an omnibus edition on November 7, 2007. In 2009, Yen Press acquired the North American and UK license of Azumanga Daioh, and released a new translation in December 2009 in an omnibus volume. In Europe, Azumanga Daioh is licensed in French by Kurokawa, in German by Tokyopop, in Spanish by Norma Editorial, and in Finnish by Punainen jättiläinen. In Asia, the series has been licensed in Korean by Daiwon C.I., in Thai by Negibose Comics, in Vietnam by TVM Comics, and in Chinese by Tong Li Publishing. It was the first yonkoma manga translated in France.

Plot

Azumanga Daioh chronicles the everyday life in an unnamed Japanese high school of six girls and two of their teachers: child prodigy Chiyo Mihama and her struggle to fit in with girls five years older; reserved Sakaki and her obsession with the cute animals who seem to hate her; spacey Ayumu “Osaka” Kasuga with a skewed perspective on the world; Koyomi “Yomi” Mizuhara’s aggravation at an annoying best friend; Tomo Takino, whose energy is rivaled only by her lack of sense; sporty Kagura and her one-sided athletics rivalry with Sakaki; their homeroom teacher Yukari Tanizaki; and her friend, physical education teacher Minamo “Nyamo” Kurosawa.

Secondary characters include Kimura-sensei, a creepy male teacher with an obsession with teenage girls, and Kaorin, a female classmate with a crush on Sakaki.

The story covers three years of tests, talking between classes, culture festivals, and athletic events at school, as well as time spent traveling to and from school, studying at Chiyo’s house, and vacations at Chiyo’s summer beach home and the fictional theme park Magical Land, concluding with the graduation of the main cast. It is generally realistic in tone, marked by occasional bursts of surrealism and absurdity, such as Osaka imagining Chiyo’s ponytails being “unscrewed” from her head and an episode featuring the characters’ New Year’s dreams.

 

Film Friday- Claymore

Film Friday- Claymore

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Anime

Madhouse produced a twenty-six episode anime series based on the manga series. Directed by Hiroyuki Tanaka, the series aired between April 2007 and September 2007 in Japan on Nippon Television. The series adapts the first eleven volumes of its source material over the first 24 episodes, then uses an alternate ending for its final two episodes. It is speculated by many that this is the probable reason for the lack of a second season.

As of February 2008, seven DVD volumes, each containing three episodes of the anime, have been released in Japan by Avex Trax. In addition, four limited edition sets have been released. The first limited edition set contains the first DVD volume, while the other three sets each contain two DVD volumes. The latest limited edition set and volumes were released on January 30, 2008. Two more DVD volumes and one more limited edition set are planned for release on March 26, 2008. On February 15, 2008, Funimation announced that it has acquired the Region 1 DVD and broadcast licenses for the anime, and released the first DVD in North America on October 14, 2008: as of February 2009, three volumes have been released. On February 16, 2010, Funimation released a boxed set containing the complete series in Blu-ray format. Madman Entertainment has licensed the series and Volume 1 released early 2009.

The series made its North American television debut when it started airing on the FUNimation Channel September 6, 2010. Netflix also made Claymore available for streaming, but the series has been removed as of April 2012. All 26 episodes are available on Hulu, however, and Funimation via their streaming video service and DVD.

Wednesday News- December 21, 2016

Wednesday News- December 21, 2016

News-

Natsume’s Book of Friends Manga Gets 6th Anime in 2017- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-12-20/natsume-book-of-friends-manga-gets-6th-anime-in-2017/.110154

Nioh PS4 Gaem’s Cutscnes, Animated Story Video Streamed- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-12-21/nioh-ps4-game-cutscene-animated-story-video-streamed/.110122

New Gintama Anime’s Promo Previews Theme Song- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-12-20/new-gintama-anime-promo-previews-theme-song/.110179

Anime-

  • Gun Frontier DVD
  • My Love Story!! BD
  • My Love Story!! DVD
  • Owarimongatari Volume 2 BD
  • Shakugan no Shana III (Final) BD/DVD S.A.V.E Edition
  • Shakugan no Shana The Movie BD/DVD S.A.V.E. Edition
  • Shakugan no Shana S OVA Series BD/DVD S.A.V.E. Edition
  • Star Fleet DVD
  • Wakaba Girl BD
  • Wakaba Girl DVD

Manga-

  • Afterschool Charisma GN 12
  • Bungō Stray Dogs GN 1
  • The Case Study of Vanitas GN 1
  • The Complete Chi’s Sweet Home GN Omnibus 4C
  • GA: Geijutsuka Art Design Class GN 7
  • Gangsta: Cursed GN 1
  • Goodnight Punpun GN 4
  • Kiss Him, Not Me GN 8
  • Kuma Miko: Girl Meets Bear GN 2
  • Lord Marksman and Vanadis GN 2
  • Master Keaton GN 9
  • Tokyo Ghoul GN 10
  • Tomie Complete Deluxe Edition (Hardcover)

Manga Monday- Claymore

Manga Monday- Claymore

claymore

Claymore is a dark fantasy manga series written and illustrated by Norihiro Yagi. The series initially premiered in the now defunct Monthly Shōnen Jump in the May 2001 issue. When the magazine was canceled in June 2007, the series was temporarily moved to Weekly Shōnen Jump where it was published monthly. When Jump Square was introduced in November 2007, the series was moved to it. The individual chapters were published in tankōbon volumes by Shueisha, with 27 volumes released between January 2002 and December 2014.

The Claymore manga is licensed for an English language release in North America by Viz Media. It released the first volume of the series on April 4, 2006 and the last volume on October 6, 2015.

The series is set on a fictional medieval island where humans are plagued by Yoma (妖魔), humanoid shape-shifters that feed on humans. A mysterious group, known as The Organization, creates human-Yoma hybrids to kill Yoma for a fee. These female warriors wear armored uniforms. The public refer to them as “Claymores,” alluding to their Claymore swords, or “Silver-eyed Witches,” due to their silver eyes.

Yoma and Claymore warriors alike are powered by a demonic energy, Yoki, which allows shape-shifting and extreme strength. When warriors use too much Yoki, they “awaken,” becoming a super-Yoma called an Awakened Being. The act of awakening is likened to the feeling of sexual climax, so while both male and female warriors existed in the past only the women proved to be successful warriors and so the creation of male Claymores stopped altogether.

The island world is divided into 47 districts, with one warrior assigned to each. Claymore warriors No. 1 through 47 are ranked on their baseline Yoki potential, strength, agility, intelligence, sensing and leadership. A warrior’s rank rises and falls according to the warrior’s strength in relation to other warriors. It is unclear whether the warriors strength comes from training/experience or if the potential lies within the warriors themselves.

In addition to all having different names, most warriors (usually high in rank) further their individuality by possessing a unique sword technique, fighting style, or yoki ability. The sword techniques are unique to the Claymores: yoma and awakened beings do not fight with swords and a normal human body could not perform them. Examples of sword techniques are: twisting the arm around and thrusting for a drill-like strike, unsheathing and re-sheathing the sword faster than the eye can see, or vibrating the sword so quickly the enemy cannot tell where the blade is coming from. A few fighting styles include: stretching the arm, fighting with two blades, and releasing a burst of yoki for a momentary burst of speed. For yoki ability, there are several Claymores who can sense yoki over vast distances and very accurately in close quarters. This appears to be, while not offensive, a very rare and valuable ability and the Claymores in the Organization with this ability are usually highly ranked. In addition, there are four Claymores that have offensive techniques that are yoki based. The first is Galatea’s ability to control her opponents yoki for brief periods during battle, usually to cause the enemy’s attack to miss. The second is Teresa’s: her ability to sense yoki is so strong that she can sense it moving around her opponents body and can therefore sense how and when her enemy would attack next, a technique later copied by Clare. The third ability is that of Raftela who is able to manipulate the vision and movements of other Claymores. She is employed as an anti-training warrior.

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Film Friday- Fushigi Yuugi

Film Friday- Fushigi Yuugi

fushigi-yuugi

The series describes the various trials of Miaka Yūki and Yui Hongo, two Middle-school students. While at the library one day, Miaka and Yui encounter a strange book known as The Universe of the Four Gods. Reading this book transports them into the novel’s universe in ancient China. Yui is transported back to the real world almost immediately, but Miaka finds herself the Priestess of Suzaku. Miaka is destined to gather the seven Celestial Warriors of the god Suzaku in order to summon Suzaku and obtain three wishes. She falls in love with the Celestial Warrior Tamahome, who eventually reciprocates and Miaka’s desire to use a wish to enter the high school of her choice begins to shift towards finding a way to be with Tamahome. Yui is also drawn into the book when she tries to help Miaka to come back to the real world; becoming the Priestess of Seiryuu, working against Miaka out of jealousy over Tamahome and revenge for the humiliation and pain she had suffered when she first came to into the book’s world.

Studio Pierrot adapted the series into a 52-episode anime series. The show originally aired from April 6, 1995 through March 28, 1996 on the anime satellite channel Animax and on the regular cable channel TV Tokyo. The anime series spawned three Original Video Animation releases, with the first having three episodes, the second having six, and the final OVA, Fushigi Yûgi Eikoden, spanning four episodes.

Produced by Studio Pierrot, the fifty-two episode Fushigi Yûgi anime series premiered on Animax and TV Tokyo on April 6, 1995. The series aired weekly, until the final episode that was aired on March 28, 1996. The series was licensed for English-language release to Region 1 DVD and VHS format by Geneon Entertainment, then named Pioneer, under the expanded title “Fushigi Yûgi: The Mysterious Play.” It has been suggested that Geneon chose to license the series based on its popularity among the fansub community. The main series was released in eight individual volumes and as two box sets, the “Suzaku” and “Seiryū” sets. Media Blasters license-rescued the series, and released the first season to DVD on June 19, 2012. Season 2 was released on February 12, 2013.

Original video animations

Following the anime adaptation three original video animation (OVA) works appeared. The first, spanning three episodes, takes place a year after the events of the main series and has no ties to the original manga. It was released to DVD on October 25, 1996. The second OVA, which has 6 episodes, animates the last four volumes of the manga series that had been left out of the main series. The episodes were split across two volumes, with the first released May 25, 1997, and the second coming over a year later on August 25, 1998.

The final OVA, Fushigi Yûgi Eikoden, spans four episodes and is based on two of the light novels written by Megumi Nishizaki. Released on December 21, 2001, it focuses on a new character, Mayo Sakaki, a sixteen-year-old girl who attends Yotsubadai High School. Upon finding “The Universe of the Four Gods” in a trash bin at the park, Mayo soon discovers that the story remains incomplete. In the unfamiliar world of the book, Mayo must come to terms with her own life and the unhappiness within it.

Geneon Entertainment also licensed the OVAs for Region 1 DVD release. The first two OVAs were released together in a set titled “Fushigi Yûgi: The Mysterious Play OVA”. Fushigi Yûgi Eikoden was released as a single disc volume. The OVAs were released with similar packaging as the main series, to give them a consistent look. All three OVA series have also been re-licensed by Media Blasters.

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Wednesday News- December 14, 2016

Wednesday News- December 14, 2016

News-

Anime Series Turning 10 in 2017 Are Guaranteed to Make You Feel Old- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/interest/2016-12-14/anime-series-turning-10-in-2017-are-guaranteed-to-make-you-feel-old/.109861

Sakura Quest Anime’s 1st Teaser Video Previews Opening Theme- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-12-14/sakura-quest-anime-1st-teaser-video-previews-opening-theme/.109891

Dragon Ball’s Yamcha Spinoff Manga Runs for 3 Chapters- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-12-14/dragon-ball-yamcha-spinoff-manga-runs-for-3-chapters/.109888

Anime-

  • Angelic Layer BD
  • Durarara!! ×2 The Third Arc Volume 6 BD
  • Durarara!! ×2 The Third Arc Volume 6 DVD
  • Hakuōki: Record of the Jade Blood BD
  • Jungle Emperor Leo BD
  • The Legend of the Legendary Heroes BD/DVD S.A.V.E. Edition
  • Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions! BD/DVD Box Set
  • One Piece Season 8 Part 5 DVD
  • Pokémon XY: Kalos Quest Set 2 DVD
  • Rampo Kitan: Game of Laplace Complete Collection BD/DVD
  • Yamibo – Darkness, the Hat, and the Travelers of the Books BD

Manga-

  • 12 Beast GN 4
  • Akame ga KILL! ZERO GN 4
  • Aoharu x Machine Gun GN 2
  • Attack on Titan: Before the Fall GN 9
  • Blame! GN 2
  • Complex Age GN 3
  • Fruits Basket Collector’s Edition GN  8
  • He’s My Only Vampire GN 9
  • The Honor Student at Magic High School GN 5
  • Itsuwaribito GN 19
  • Kin-iro Mosaic GN 1
  • Magi GN 21
  • Monster Hunter: Flash Hunter GN 5
  • My Youth Romantic Comedy Is Wrong, As I Expected @ comic GN 3
  • New Lone Wolf and Cub GN 11
  • NTR: Netsuzou Trap GN 2
  • Of the Red, the Light, and the Ayakashi GN 5
  • Overlord GN 3
  • Servamp GN 8
  • Spoof on Titan GN 2
  • Strike the Blood GN 5
  • Übel Blatt GN 7
  • Yowamushi Pedal Omnibus GN 4

What is this Japanese Thing? OVA or Original Video Animation

What is this Japanese Thing? OVA or Original Video Animation

Original video animation , abbreviated as OVA  media (and sometimes as OAV, original animated video), are animated films and series made specially for release in home video formats without prior showings on television or in theatres, though the first part of an OVA series may be broadcast for promotional purposes. OVA titles were originally made available on VHS, later becoming more popular on LaserDisc and eventually DVD. Starting in 2008, the term OAD (original animation DVD) began to refer to DVD releases published bundled with their source-material manga.

Like anime made for television broadcast, OVAs sub-divide into episodes. OVA media (tapes, laserdiscs, or DVDs) usually contain just one episode each. Episode length varies from title to title: each episode may run from a few minutes to two hours or more. An episode length of 30 minutes occurs quite commonly, but no standard length exists. In some cases, the length of episodes in a specific OVA may vary greatly, for example in GaoGaiGar FINAL, the first 7 episodes last around 30 minutes, while the last episode lasts 50 minutes; the OVA Key the Metal Idol consists of 15 separate episodes, ranging in length from 20 minutes to nearly two hours each; The OVA Hellsing Ultimate had released 10 episodes, ranging from 42 minutes to 56 minutes. An OVA series can run anywhere from a single episode (essentially a direct-to-video movie) to dozens of episodes in length. Probably the longest OVA series ever made, Legend of the Galactic Heroes, spanned 110 main episodes and 52 gaiden (side stories) episodes.

Many popular series first appear animated as an OVA, and later grow to become television series or movies. Tenchi Muyo!, for example, began as an OVA but went on to spawn several TV series, three movies, and numerous other spin-offs. Producers make other OVA releases as sequels, side stories, music-video collections, or bonus episodes that continue existing as television series or films, such as Love Hina Again and Wolf’s Rain.

OVA titles generally have a much higher budget per episode than in a television series; therefore the technical quality of animation can generally surpass that in television series; occasionally it even equals that of animated movies.

OVA titles have a reputation for the detailed plots and character-development which can result from the greater creative freedom offered to writers and directors in comparison with other formats. This also allows for animated adaptations of manga to reflect their source material more faithfully. Since OVA episodes and series have no fixed conventional length, OVA directors can use however much time they like to tell the story. Time becomes available for significant background, character, and plot development. This contrasts with television episodes (which must begin and conclude in 22 to 26 minutes) and with films (which rarely last more than two hours). In the same way, no pressure exists to produce “filler content” to extend a short plot into a full television series. The producers of OVA titles generally target a specific audience, rather than the more mass-market audience of films and television series, or may feel less constrained by content-restrictions and censorship (such as for violence, nudity, and language) often placed on television series. For example, the Kissxsis OVA series generally contains more sexual themes than its television counterpart.

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Manga Monday- Fushigi Yuugi

Manga Monday- Fushigi Yuugi

fushigi_yugi_english_volume_1

Today’s Manga Monday is on Fushigi Yuugi and excellent shojo series from a master of her craft!

Fushigi Yūgi, also known as Fushigi Yûgi: The Mysterious Play or Curious Play, is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Yuu Watase. Shogakukan published Fushigi Yûgi in Shōjo Comic in its original serialized form from May 1992 through June 1996. Viz Media released the manga series in English in North America starting in 1999. Spanning eighteen volumes, Fushigi Yûgi tells the story of two teenaged girls, Miaka and Yui, who are pulled into The Universe of the Four Gods, a mysterious book at the National Library. It is essentially based on four mythological creatures of China.

A thirteen-volume Japanese light novel series also followed Fushigi Yûgi: Shōgakukan published the novels from January 30, 1998 to September 26, 2003. On October 25, 2003, Watase began releasing a prequel to the manga series, Fushigi Yûgi Genbu Kaiden, and ended in May 2013. Another prequel to the manga series, Fushigi Yûgi Byakko Ibun was published in February 2015.

fushigi-yuugi-genbu-kaiden-l0

Written and illustrated by Yuu Watase, Fushigi Yûgi originally appeared in serial form in the monthly manga magazine Shōjo Comic. It premiered in the May 1992 issue and ran for over four years, with the final chapter appearing in the June 1996 issue. The series was simultaneously published in eighteen collected volumes by Shogakukan, with new volumes being released on a quarterly schedule.

In 1992, Viz Media licensed the manga for an English language release in North America. The series was originally released in a flipped trade paperback format, starting in August 1998. Several characters have both Japanese pronunciations and Chinese pronunciations. In 1998 Watase visited the United States and met with Viz staff members at their San Francisco headquarters. Viz kept the original Chinese names of characters at the request of Watase. Bill Flanagan, the editor of the English version, asked Watase if he should use the Chinese names for popular characters such as Tai Yi-Jun (Taitsukun) and she also asked for the Chinese names to be used there. The characters with names remaining in Japanese in the English version are the characters such as Tamahome who have Japanese pronunciations of ancient constellations; there was never any intention of them having Chinese names.

This caused some confusion for fans as the anime version uses the Japanese names. For example, in the manga, Hotohori’s country is named “Hong-Nan” rather than the “Konan” found in the anime series. After eight volumes, Viz stopped publication of Fushigi Yûgi, reviving it in June 2003 when it released the first two volumes in unflipped standard manga size volumes. The remaining volumes were released on a quarterly schedule, including the remaining ten volumes. The final volume of the series was released in April 2006. The dates and ISBN numbers given for the first eight volumes in the table on the link above are for the second edition releases.

Viz also serialized Fushigi Yûgi in their manga anthology magazine, Animerica Extra, starting with the October 1998 debut issue and running until the December 2004 issue, the magazine’s final issue. In January 2009, Viz is slated to re-release the series as part of their “VIZBIG” line, which usually combines two or three individual volumes of the original release into a single, larger volume.

Novels

Over a series of five years, Megumi Nishizaki wrote thirteen Japanese light novels based on Fushigi Yûgi. Illustrated by Yuu Watase, Fushigi Yûgi Gaiden primarily explores the lives the various Celestial Warriors before they are seen in the manga. The only two novels to be set after the manga, Eikō Den (Jōkan) and Eikō Den (Gekan), later became the basis for the third Fushigi Yûgi original video animation, Fushigi Yûgi Eikoden. Originally published by Shogakukan, none of the novels have been licensed for English release.

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