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Month: January 2017

Character Special- Boys over Flowers (All Characters)

Character Special- Boys over Flowers (All Characters)

Tsukushi Makino
The protagonist, Tsukushi Makino is one of the very few students studying at Eitoku High School to come from a poor family. Although her family can barely afford to pay Tsukushi’s school fees, her parents push her to continue at the school hoping she will seduce a rich man and take them out of poverty. Tsukushi is not thrilled about being stuck at Eitoku, and is determined to remain out of sight until graduation. However, after defending her friend who accidentally falls down a set of stairs and onto Tsukasa Domyouji, she, instead, receives a red card–a declaration of war from the F4. This officially marks her for future torment by the F4 and the rest of the student body.
However, unlike most of the F4’s targets, Tsukushi retaliates by directly attacking Tsukasa. This unexpected retaliation and steadfast resistance to the hazing is one that he has never encountered from a victim before, and sparks a nearly obsessive fixation with her within Tsukasa. Initially, Tsukushi hates all of the F4 with the personal exception of Rui Hanazawa, for whom she harbors romantic feelings. But, after Rui goes off to chase after his childhood sweetheart Shizuka, Tsukushi slowly falls in love with Tsukasa. In this process, she allows her fierce determination and her stubborn, hardworking ways show through, and in the end, turns the F4 into her close friends. In the end, Tsukushi and Tsukasa became a couple. It is hinted that they will get married when the time is right.
Tsukasa Domyouji
The leader of the F4 group and the heir to the large Domyouji Enterprises, and his family is extremely wealthy and influential within Japan. Tsukasa spent much of his childhood with the rest of the F4 since his mother was always overseas, and his older sister had moved to Los Angeles after her marriage. His mother, in particular, is cold towards him, and wants to control his life for the sake of preserving the family name.
As the extremely hot-blooded, hot-headed and volatile leader of the F4, Tsukasa uses his power to rule over the entire school. He uses an infamous red card and attaches it inside anyone’s locker who has made the F4, particularly him, upset. A red card gives the entire student body at Eitoku free rein to bully, prank and humiliate the receiver until they decide to leave the school. However, Tsukushi’s declaration of war against the F4, retaliation against the student body and strong will, after receiving the red card, begins to remind Tsukasa of his beloved older sister, Tsubaki. Consequently, Tsukasa grows increasingly fond of Tsukushi, falling madly in love with her. Unbeknownst to him, Tsukasa begins to constantly do things to attempt to impress Tsukushi, like unsuccessfully straightening his curly hair, and so on.
Because Tsukasa is used to always getting his way, he is, initially, not very good at interacting with Tsukushi. He frequently makes fun of her family’s poverty and responds angrily when she refuses to do as he says. He is also extremely possessive and protective of Tsukushi, and frequently loses his temper and gets extremely jealous when anyone tries to get close to her. As time passes, he slowly begins to mature and develops a greater understanding of how to interact positively with others, a consequence of his relationship with Tsukushi.
Rui Hanazawa
Rui is Tsukasa’s best friend and Tsukushi’s first romantic interest. He is generally quiet, distant, uninterested in people and is said to be autistic, but has a soft spot for his close friends and the model Shizuka Todou, for whom he has harbored feelings for since childhood. His character is a bit complex, and his feelings for Tsukushi are in a nearly constant state of flux varying from annoyance to love. Above all, he cares about her deeply.
Rui likes to be left alone and hides in quiet, isolated places such as the emergency exit at the school and other spots (music room). While Tsukushi is being bullied by the F4, Rui does nothing to her and helps her with her problems after accidentally hearing her rant about the F4 on the emergency exit. After he comes back from France and witnessing Shizuka’s marriage, Rui was very frustrated and slowly falls in love with Tsukushi. However, after learning that Tsukushi genuinely loves Tsukasa, Rui backs off. Tsukasa also befriends Rui again. After Tsukasa’s engagement to Shigeru Ookawahara, Rui, mends his relationship with Shizuka and, once again, grows closer to Tsukushi, and encourages her to chase after Tsukasa and to not run from her feelings. He, the F4 and Shigeru eventually set up a plan to help them be together at the end.
Sojirou Nishikado
Sojirou is the biggest player of the F4 and, perhaps, the most perverted of them all. He is incredibly interested in traditional Japanese tea ceremonies, which is his family’s business. For the most part, he and Akira usually work to keep the peace within the group and following Tsukasa.
Akira Mimasaka
Akira is arguably the kindest and most mature member of F4. His family is very powerful in the Japanese underground (in the manga they own a large trading company). He keeps his cool and rarely loses his temper, although when he does, even Domyouji has to run for the hills. Akira is also a “madam killer”. His taste tends towards older women 10 years his senior, due to his childish young mother, who is only 38 years old. He has a pair of young twin sister who annoy him due to their extreme affection for him. He is also the only F4 member who only uses cash.
Yuuki Matsuoka
Yuuki is Tsukushi’s best friend as well as a childhood friend. The two work together at a dango shop after school. Tsukushi and Yuuki also went to kindergarten, elementary school and junior high together. She cares a lot about Tsukushi’s feelings and does not want anybody to hurt Tsukushi. Yuuki offers Tsukushi a lot of encouragement and advice about her situation with the F4. In the manga she, and Sojirou sleep together then part ways.
Shizuka Todou 
Shizuka is a rich heiress and a childhood friend of the F4. She and Rui particularly are very close; she was the first person who was able to get him to come out of his shell, and the two were inseparable for much of their childhood. She began a modeling career during her high school years, but shocks everyone at her twentieth birthday party by announcing that she plans to give up her career as a model as well as her position as the Todou heiress to move to Paris and become a human rights lawyer. She was very kind toward Tsukushi, as she sees her as Rui’s romantic interest. Rui initially accompanies Shizuka to Paris at Tsukushi’s request, but their relationship suffers as Shizuka spends more and more time at work. At the end of the series, she comes back and confesses that she wants only him. This makes him join the foreign exchange program to go to Paris to be with her.

Manga Monday- Boys over Flowers aka Hana Yori Dango

Manga Monday- Boys over Flowers aka Hana Yori Dango

Hana Yori Dango is a Japanese shōjo manga series written and illustrated by Yoko Kamio. The story is set in Eitoku Academy, an elite school for children from rich families. It follows lead protagonist Tsukushi Makino, a student from a working-class family, and the members of Eitoku Academy’s elite Flower Four, commonly known as the “F4”.
Hana Yori Dango was serialized in Shueisha’s bi-weekly Margaret magazine from October 1992 to September 2003, and was collected into 37 tankōbon volumes. The manga has been licensed by Viz Media for publication in the United States.
Boys Over Flowers won the 41st Shogakukan Manga Award for shōjo manga. It is also the best-selling shōjo manga of all time, having sold 61 million copies as of 2015.
Kamio began a sequel, titled Boys Over Flowers Season 2, in Shueisha’s Shōnen Jump+ online magazine on February 15, 2015.
Hana Yori Dango was serialized in Shueisha’s bi-weekly Margaret magazine from October 1992 to September 2003 and was collected into 37 volumes. The manga has been licensed by Viz Media for publication in the United States. It has also been published by Glénat in France and by Planeta DeAgostini in Spain.
In July 2006, a short story based on the manga was published in issue 15 of Margaret magazine. Another two-installment short story was published in January 2007. Both short stories were done by Yoko Kamio.

Film Friday- InuYasha

Film Friday- InuYasha

It was adapted into two anime television series produced by Sunrise. The first was broadcast for 167 episodes on Yomiuri TV in Japan from October 16, 2000 until September 13, 2004. The second series, called Inuyasha: The Final Act, began airing five years later on October 3, 2009 to cover the rest of the manga series and ended on March 29, 2010 after 26 episodes. Four feature films and an original video animation have also been released. Other merchandise include video games and a light novel. Viz Media licensed the manga, the two anime series, and movies for North America. Both Inuyasha and Inuyasha: The Final Act aired in the United States on Adult Swim (and later on its revived Toonami block) from 2002 until 2015.

Inuyasha

The first Inuyasha anime adaptation produced by Sunrise premiered in Japan on Animax on October 16, 2000 and ran for 167 episodes till its conclusion on September 13, 2004. It was also broadcast on Yomiuri TV and Nippon Television. In East Asia and South Asia it was aired on Animax’s English-language networks. Avex collected the episodes in a total of seven series of DVDs volumes distributed in Japan between May 30, 2001 and July 27, 2005.

The English dub of the anime was licensed to be released in North America by Viz Media. The series was first-ran on Adult Swim (although it had originally been planned for Toonami) from August 31, 2002 to October 27, 2006, with reruns from 2006 to 2014. When Toonami became a block on Adult Swim, Inuyasha aired there from November 2012 to March 1, 2014, when the network announced that they had lost the broadcast rights to the series. The series aired in Canada on YTV’s Bionix programming block from September 5, 2003 to December 1, 2006. Viz collected the series in a total of 55 DVD volumes, while seven box sets were also released.

Inuyasha: The Final Act

In 2009’s 34th issue of Weekly Shōnen Sunday, published July 22, 2009, it was officially announced that a 26-episode anime adaption of volumes 36 to the end of the manga would be made by the first anime’s same cast and crew and would air on Japan’s YTV. The following week, Viz Media announced it had licensed the new adaptation, titled Inuyasha: The Final Act. The series premiered on October 3, 2009 in Japan with the episodes being simulcast via Hulu and Weekly Shōnen Sunday in the United States. In other parts of Asia the episodes were aired the same week on Animax Asia. The anime completed its run on March 29, 2010. Aniplex collected the series into a total of seven DVDs released between December 23, 2009 and June 23, 2010.

Viz Media released the series in two DVD or Blu-ray sets that include an English dub. The first thirteen episodes comprising set 1 were released on November 20, 2012, and the final thirteen episodes were released on February 12, 2013. The series began broadcasting in the United States and Canada on Viz Media’s online network, Neon Alley, on October 2, 2012. On October 24, 2014, it was announced that Adult Swim would air The Final Act on the Toonami block, beginning on November 15, at 2:00 a.m. EST.

Films

The series spawned four animated films which feature original plot, rather than being based specifically on the manga, written by Katsuyuki Sumisawa who wrote the anime episodes. The films have also been released with English subtitles and dubbed audio tracks to Region 1 DVD by Viz Media.

The first film, Inuyasha the Movie: Affections Touching Across Time, was released in Japan on December 16, 2001. In the film, Inuyasha, Kagome, Shippo, Sango, and Miroku must face Menomaru, a demonic enemy brought to life by a Shikon Shard, as they continue their quest to gather said shards. In the second film, Inuyasha the Movie: The Castle Beyond the Looking Glass, released on December 21, 2002, the group defeats Naraku and returns to their normal lives only to have to deal with a new enemy named Kaguya. The third film, Inuyasha the Movie: Swords of an Honorable Ruler, was released on December 20, 2003. In it, a third sword of Inuyasha’s father called So’unga is unleashed from its centuries-old seal and seeks to destroy the Earth forcing Inuyasha and Sesshomaru to work together to stop it. The fourth and the final film, Inuyasha the Movie: Fire on the Mystic Island, was released on December 23, 2004, and depicts Inuyasha and his friends attempting to rescue children trapped on the mysterious island Houraijima by the wrath of powerful demons known as The Four War Gods.

The four films have earned together over US$20 million in Japanese box offices.

Original video animations

A 30-minute original video animation (OVA), Black Tessaiga , was presented on July 30, 2008 at an “It’s a Rumic World” exhibit at the Matsuya Ginza department store in Tokyo’s Ginza shopping district. The episode uses the original voice cast from the anime series. It was released in Japan on October 20, 2010 in both DVD and Blu-ray formats.

Wednesday News- January 25, 2017

Wednesday News- January 25, 2017

News-

Funimation Announces Interviews with Monster Girls English Dub Cast- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2017-01-25/funimation-announces-interviews-with-monster-girls-english-dub-cast/.111471

Zo Zo Zo Zombie- kin Manga Gets Special Anime- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2017-01-25/zo-zo-zo-zombie-kun-manga-gets-special-anime/.111457

Sailor Moon Marks 25th Anniversary With Monster Hunter, Sanrio, More Crossovers- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/interest/2017-01-25/sailor-moon-marks-25th-anniversary-with-monster-hunter-sanrio-more-crossovers/.111458

Anime-

  • Attack on Titan Season 1 BDP
  • ERASED Volume 2 BDC
  • Garo the Animation Season 2 Part 1 BD/DVDA
  • Infinite Stratos 2 Premium Edition BD Box Set
  • Triage X BD
  • Triage X DVD

Manga-

  • Akame ga KILL! GN 9
  • Big Order GN 1
  • A Certain Magical Index GN 8
  • Death March to the Parallel World Rhapsody GN 1
  • First Love Monster GN 6
  • Forget Me Not GN 6
  • Fruits Basket Collector’s Edition GN 9
  • The Girl From the Other Side: Siúil, a Rún GN 1
  • Horimiya GN 6
  • Immortal Hounds GN 3
  • The Isolator GN 1
  • Liselotte and Witch’s Forest GN 3
  • Murciélago GN 1
  • Nurse Hitomi’s Monster Infirmary GN 5
  • Rokka: Braves of the Six Flowers GN 1
  • Scum’s Wish GN 2P
  • Taboo Tattoo GN 5
  • Today’s Cerberus GN 2
  • Tohyo Game GN 2
  • Umineko When They Cry GN 15
  • Void’s Enigmatic Mansion GN 5

Manga Monday- InuYasha

Manga Monday- InuYasha

Inuyasha, also known as Inuyasha: A Feudal Fairy Tale, is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Rumiko Takahashi. It premiered in Weekly Shōnen Sunday on November 13, 1996 and concluded on June 18, 2008, with the chapters collected into 56 tankōbon volumes by Shogakukan.

The series follows Kagome Higurashi, a 15-year-old girl from Tokyo who is transported to the Sengoku period after falling into a well in her family shrine, where she meets the half-demon dog Inuyasha. When a monster from that era tries to take the magical Shikon Jewel embodied in Kagome, she accidentally shatters the Jewel into many pieces that are dispersed across Japan. Inuyasha and Kagome start traveling to recover it before the powerful demon Naraku finds all the shards. Inuyasha and Kagome gain several allies during their journey, including Shippo, Miroku, Sango and Kirara. In contrast to the typically comedic nature of much of Takahashi’s previous work, Inuyasha deals with darker subject matter, using the setting of the Sengoku period to easily display the violent content.

Written and illustrated by Rumiko Takahashi, Inuyasha premiered in Japan in the November 13, 1996 issue of Weekly Shōnen Sunday, where it ran until its conclusion in the June 18, 2008 issue. The chapters were collected into 56 tankōbon volumes published by Shogakukan, with the first volume released in May 1997 and the last released in February 2009. In 2013, a special “Epilogue” chapter was published in Weekly Shōnen Sunday as part of the “Heroes Come Back” anthology composed of short stories by manga artists to raise funds for recovery of the areas afflicted by the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Viz Media licensed the series for an English translated release in North America. Initially, Viz released it in monthly American comic book format, each issue containing two or three chapters from the original manga, but eventually abandoned this system in favor of trade paperbacks with the same chapter divisions as the Japanese volumes. Viz released its first trade paperback volume in March 1998. At the time, American manga reprints were normally “flipped” to conform to the American convention of reading books from left to right by mirroring the original artwork; among other effects, this caused right-handed characters to appear left-handed. Viz later stopped flipping its new manga releases, although Inuyasha was already well into printing by the time this change was made with volume 38. As of January 11, 2011, all 56 volumes have been released in North America. From November 2009 to February 2014, Viz reprinted the series in their “VizBig” format, combining three of the original volumes into a single omnibus with slightly larger pages and full-color bonus art that was previously reduced to grayscale, and in the original right to left format. Viz Media also issues a separate series of ani-manga volumes which are derived from full-color screenshots of the anime episodes. These volumes are slightly smaller than the regular manga volumes, are oriented in the Japanese tradition of right to left, feature new covers with higher quality pages, and a higher price point versus the regular volumes. Each ani-manga volume is arranged into chapters that correspond to the anime episodes rather than the manga.

Film Friday- Trigun

Film Friday- Trigun

Both manga were adapted into an anime television series in 1998. Madhouse animated the TV series which aired on TV Tokyo from April 1, 1998 to September 30, 1998, totaling 26 episodes. An animated feature film called Trigun: Badlands Rumble was released in April 2010.

Anime

Madhouse produced an anime series based on the manga, also titled Trigun. Directed by Satoshi Nishimura, the series was broadcast on TV Tokyo from April 1 to September 30, 1998. It is currently licensed for DVD & Blu-ray in the United States by Funimation Entertainment, who re-released it on DVD on October 27, 2010. The show initially failed to garner a large audience in Japan during its original showing in 1998, but gained a substantial fan base following its North American premiere on Cartoon Network in early 2003. Nightow has stated that due to the finality of the anime’s ending, it is unlikely any continuation will be made.

Film

The October 2005 issue of NEO includes an interview with Masao Maruyama, Madhouse’s founder and series planner. In the article he revealed that the studio has been working on a Trigun movie that would be released in “a couple of years”. The November 2005 issue of Anime Insider also confirmed this news.
In May 2007, Nightow confirmed at the Anime Central Convention that the Trigun movie was in the early stages of pre-production with a near-final script, although he did not divulge any plot information.

In February 2008, more details about the Trigun movie emerged on the cover of volume 14 of the Trigun Maximum manga, announcing that the movie was scheduled for 2009. In October 2009, however, the movie’s official website announced a new Japanese premiere set for spring 2010. The story of the movie, as depicted from the cover, was going to be about “Vash vs. Wolfwood”, the two main characters of the manga.

In July 2009, at The Anime Expo convention in Los Angeles, California, Yasuhiro Nightow and Satoshi Nishimura held a panel for the movie. Shigeru Kitayama and Noriyuki Jinguji also made appearances to promote the movie. During the convention a trailer was shown depicting characters of the movie.
The film was animated by the same company that animated the television show, Madhouse.

The film is titled Trigun: Badlands Rumble and opened in theaters in Japan on April 24, 2010. The film was shown to an American audience first at the Sakura-Con 2010 in Seattle, Washington on Friday, April 2, 2010 at 5:00 PM, and the director held a 15-minute Q&A session before the movie, explaining the reasons it was not dubbed, subbed, and why it was premiered first at the convention, also explaining the new characters. The movie was shown again on Saturday and Sunday according to the schedule. At Anime Expo 2010, Funimation announced that they have licensed the film as they have with the TV series and plan to release it into theaters. Funimation later had a showing of a subbed version of the movie later during the same Anime Expo.
The film made its US television premiere on Saturday, December 29, 2013 on Adult Swim’s Toonami block.

 

I have attached the opening song for Trigun because it is just so much fun! But it much Vash look cooler than he really is. Enjoy!

 

Wednesday News- January 18, 2017

Wednesday News- January 18, 2017

News-

Shinkai’s ‘your name.’ Anime Film OPens in Theaters in U.S., Canada on April 7- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2017-01-17/shinkai-your-name-anime-film-opens-in-theaters-in-u.s-canada-on-april-7/.111060

Kenka Bancho Otome: Girl Beats Boys Anime 1st Video Introduces Cast- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2017-01-18/kenka-bancho-otome-girl-beats-boys-anime-1st-video-introduces-cast/.111187

The Winter 2017 Anime Preview Guide- https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/preview-guide/2017/winter/.110591

Anime-

  • Fairy Tail Collection 6 BD/DVDP
  • Naruto Shippūden Set 29 DVD Uncut

Manga-

  • Dorohedoro GN 20
  • Franken Fran GN 4
  • Interviews with Monster Girls GN 2
  • How to Build a Dungeon: Book of the Demon King GN 2
  • Maria Holic GN 8
  • My Girlfriend is a T-Rex GN 2
  • Non Non Biyori GN 6
  • Ninja Slayer GN 7
  • The Seven Deadly Sins GN 18
  • Disney Stitch GN 2
  • Terra Formars GN 16

 

Character Special -Trigun (all characters)

Character Special -Trigun (all characters)

Characters

Vash the Stampede is an expert marksman who tries to promote “love and peace” as he has personally said in several episodes. He can abruptly switch from merry to a stern, dangerous personality when threatened. Normally he wears a smiling facade, which Wolfwood calls a “false smile”. Beneath this smile lies the pain of the burdens that Vash has chosen to carry. Also known as The Humanoid Typhoon, he is a wandering gunman who had a 60 billion “double dollar” ($$) bounty on his head. Due to the incredible amount of damage he tends to leave after a skirmish, his status as a human has been revoked by the government; he’s now legally considered a “localized disaster”. Although a multitude of crimes are attributed to Vash — primarily mass property destruction — he always resolves conflicts with as little violence as possible and refuses to take the life of any living being. Beneath his normally cheery, even goofy demeanor, Vash conceals enormous power which he, himself, does not fully understand. His abilities allow him to dodge bullets, and exert considerable influence over events with very subtle actions such as throwing pebbles to alter the trajectory of bullets, causing a gun to misfire by surreptitiously clogging it with chewing gum, and causing adversaries to injure themselves with assorted sleight-of-hand techniques.

Meryl Stryfe and Milly Thompson are two agents of the Bernardelli Insurance Company, sent to evaluate claims regarding the Humanoid Typhoon. Initially, they dismiss the idea that the chummy Vash is the legendary Humanoid Typhoon (partially due to the lack of an introduction), but the two eventually learn (much to Meryl’s dismay) that this is indeed the person they are assigned to track. Meryl is also known as “Derringer Meryl” and carries dozens of derringer pistols concealed beneath her overcoat. Milly is also known as “Stun Gun Milly” and carries an enormous two-handed minigun that launches large metal projectiles that are designed to knock opponents off their feet.

Nicholas D. Wolfwood is a superb gunman, almost equal to Vash, himself. Wolfwood is a priest, and carries with him an enormous cross as a symbol of his faith and a reminder of his sins; however, the cross contains a machine gun, a rack of automatic pistols and a rocket launcher. Wolfwood and Vash get into many conflicts over the morality of murder. According to Wolfwood’s mentor “…we are sometimes driven to become the devil himself.”

Millions Knives is the main antagonist, and Vash’s brother. Like Vash, he is a sentient power plant created by humans, but unlike Vash, he is a cruel mass murderer that intends to wipe out the entire human race, considering them unfit for this world. Most of the situations Vash ends up in are, in one way or another, connected to Knives.

 

Manga Monday- Trigun

Manga Monday- Trigun

Trigun (Japanese: トライガン Hepburn: Toraigan) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Yasuhiro Nightow. The manga was serialized in Tokuma Shoten’s Shōnen Captain in 1995 with a total of 3 collected volumes when the magazine was discontinued in 1997. The series continued in Shōnen Gahosha’s Young King Ours magazine, under the title Trigun Maximum (トライガンマキシマム Toraigan Makishimamu), where it remained until finishing in 2008.

Plot-

Trigun revolves around a man known as “Vash the Stampede” and two Bernardelli Insurance Society employees, Meryl Stryfe and Milly Thompson, who follow him around in order to minimize the damages inevitably caused by his appearance. Most of the damage attributed to Vash is actually caused by bounty hunters in pursuit of the sixty billion double dollar bounty on Vash’s head for the destruction of the city of July. However, he cannot remember the incident due to retrograde amnesia, being able to recall only fragments of the destroyed city and memories of his childhood. Throughout his travels, Vash tries to save lives using non-lethal force. He is occasionally joined by a priest, Nicholas D. Wolfwood, who, like Vash, is a superb gunfighter with a mysterious past. As the series progresses, more about Vash’s past and the history of human civilization on the planet Gunsmoke is revealed.

 

After leaving college, Yasuhiro Nightow had gone to work selling apartments for the housing corporation Sekisui House, but struggled to keep up with his manga drawing hobby. Reassured by some successes, including a one-shot manga based on the popular video game franchise Samurai Spirits, he quit his job to draw full-time. With the help of a publisher friend, he submitted a Trigun story for the February 1996 issue of the Tokuma Shoten magazine Shōnen Captain, and began regular serialization two months later in April.

However, Shōnen Captain was canceled early in 1997, and when Nightow was approached by the magazine Young King Ours, published by Shōnen Gahōsha, they were interested in him beginning a new work. Nightow though, was troubled by the idea of leaving Trigun incomplete, and requested to be allowed to finish the series. The publishers were sympathetic, and the manga resumed in 1998 as Trigun Maximum (トライガンマキシマム Toraigan Makishimamu). The story jumps forward two years with the start of Maximum, and takes on a slightly more serious tone, perhaps due to the switch from a shōnen to a seinen magazine. Despite this, Nightow has stated that the new title was purely down to the change of publishers, and rather than being a sequel it should be seen as a continuation of the same series. The 14th tankōbon was published on February 27, 2008.

Shōnen Gahōsha later bought the rights to the original three volume manga series and reissued it as two enlarged volumes. In October 2003 the US publisher Dark Horse Comics released the expanded first volume translated into English by Digital Manga, keeping the original right-to-left format rather than mirroring the pages. Trigun Maximum followed quickly, and the entire 14-volume run was released over a five-year period from May 2004 to April 2009. Translations into French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish have also been released.

An anthology manga titled, Trigun: Multiple Bullets (トライガン マルチプルバレッツ Toraigan Maruchipuru Barettsu?) featuring short stories written by several manga artists such as Boichi, Masakazu Ishiguru, Satoshi Mizukami, Ark Performance, Yusuke Takeyama, Yuga Takauchi and Akira Sagami was released in by Shonen Gahosha in Japan in December 2011 and in North America on March 6, 2013.

Film Friday- Kare Kano (His and Her Circumstances)

Film Friday- Kare Kano (His and Her Circumstances)

Kare Kano (Japanese: 彼氏彼女の事情 Hepburn: Kareshi Kanojo no Jijō, lit. “His and Her Circumstances”) is a manga series by Masami Tsuda. It was serialized in LaLa from 1996 to 2005 and collected in 21 tankōbon volumes by Hakusensha. It depicts the romance between “perfect” student Yukino Miyazawa and her academic rival Soichiro Arima, and the relationships of several of their friends.

The series is licensed and was published in English in North America by Tokyopop. The chapters from the first seven volumes were adapted into a 26-episode anime television series by Gainax. Directed by Hideaki Anno and Kazuya Tsurumaki, the episodes were broadcast in Japan on TV Tokyo from October 1998 to March 1999. It is licensed for distribution in North America by Right Stuf International, which released it as His and Her Circumstances. It is also sub-licensed for release by Enoki Films USA under the title Tales at North Hills High.

In adapting the first seven volumes into an anime television series, director Hideaki Anno kept the same general scenes and dialogue but modified the overall feel and focus of the series, making it into a “personal case study of relationships.” He emphasizes the dialog over the animation using a variety of techniques, including iconic scenes, production sketches, real-life location shots, repeated imagery, and even using animation versions of manga panels or simply printing the lines of the dialog being spoken over static screens. However, Tsuda wanted to emphasize the comedic and romantic aspects of the series, resulting in the anime’s cancellation.