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Film Friday- Parasyte

Film Friday- Parasyte

An anime television series adaptation by Madhouse, titled Parasyte -the maxim-, aired in Japan between October 2014 and March 2015. The English-language dub aired on Adult Swim’s Toonami block in America between October 2015 and April 2016. The manga has been adapted into two live-action films in Japan in 2014 and 2015.

Plot

Parasyte centers on a male 17-year-old high school student named Shinichi Izumi, who lives with his mother and father in a quiet neighborhood in Tokyo, Japan. One night, strange worm-like creatures with drills as a ‘head’ called Parasytes appear on Earth, taking over the brains of human hosts by entering through their ears or noses. One Parasite attempts to crawl into Shinichi’s nose while he sleeps, but fails as Shinichi wakes up, and enters his body by burrowing into his arm instead. In the Japanese version, it takes over his right hand and is named Migi, after the Japanese word for ‘right’; Tokyopop’s version-(English dub), in which the images are flipped horizontally, has the Parasite take over Shinichi’s left hand and it is named Lefty.

Because Shinichi was able to prevent Migi from travelling further up into his brain, both beings retain their separate intellect and personality. As the duo encounter other Parasites, they capitalize on their strange situation and gradually form a strong bond, working together to survive. This gives them an edge in battling other Parasites who frequently attack the pair upon realization that Shinichi’s human brain is still intact. Shinichi feels compelled to fight other Parasites, who devour humans as food, while enlisting Migi’s help.

Parasites

The series’ antagonists, the Parasites are creatures of unknown origin which start off as worm-like creatures that instinctively enter the body of the nearest life form and travel to the brain to completely assimilate it while destroying the host’s identity in the process. From there, using the vital organs of the host bodies to survive, the Parasites would be driven with a need to kill humans and Parasites with failed host bodies. After assimilating their host, Parasites exhibit a variety of abilities that make them dangerous adversaries: the immediate area around their entry site (typically the head) is morphed into a versatile “parasite tissue” which can take a variety of offensive and defensive forms, and a parasite that successfully takes over a host’s brain can then maximize the physical potential of that host. In general, Parasite intelligence is comparable to humans, though their thought process is strictly rational and cold, with very little emotion. They are also capable of learning extremely quickly depending on their environment – Migi, for example, mastered Japanese after one night of reading books on the subject. While most Parasites initially acted alone, causing a chain of multiple grisly deaths coined the “mincemeat murders”, they eventually form groups for safety in numbers. By the time of the final chapter, Shinichi speculating that they might have been created as an evolutionary countermeasure to humans, the surviving Parasites are assumed to have gone into hiding and adopt themselves further into human society to keep their activities to a minimum.

Reiko Tamura
An extremely intelligent, calculating Parasite and one of the story’s main antagonists. She originally infected and took on the identity of a woman named Ryōko Tamiya, one of Shinichi’s high school teachers while suggesting a beneficial ceasefire. Unlike most of her kind, she is motivated by scientific inclinations with a drive to understand her kind’s biology, origin, and purpose. She learned that she is pregnant with a normal human infant as a consequence of being impregnated by Mr. A, deeming it interesting while forced to quit to avoid unwanted attention resulting from it. Though she intended to kill Shinichi soon after, she lets him and Migi live unmolested largely because she finds them an interesting anomaly worthy of study. After killing off Ryōko’s parents when they saw through her, the Parasite alters her face and creates the identity of “Reiko Tamura” while aligning herself with Takeshi Hirokawa. She eventually gives birth to Mr. A’s baby and later kills three of her fellow Parasites when they deemed her actions with a hired detective a threat to their plans. It was after Reiko killed the maddened detective to save her child that she allowed the police to brutally gun her down in a park instead of trying to resist or escape. The baby survives because of her protection and decision not to fight back against or run away from the police.
Tamura is portrayed by Eri Fukatsu in the film.
Mr. B
A Parasite who attacks Shinichi and tries to coerce Migi into relocating to his arm in order to extend his own lifespan. To his surprise, Migi kills him on the pretense that relocation is too risky to try.
Mr. A 
An highly aggressive Parasite formerly aligned with Reiko Tamura. When first introduced, he (or rather, his host body) fathers a child with Reiko as part of the latter’s experiment. Described by Migi as “not one of our smart ones” and called a fool by Reiko, Mr. A is extremely impulsive and animalistic. He has little capacity for subtlety or deception, and no qualms about killing humans in the presence of numerous witnesses. Shinichi is forced to battle Mr. A when he attempts to hunt Shinichi down and kill him at school. Though Shinichi and Migi mortally wound him, they are forced to flee before they could kill him. Mr. A attempts to find Reiko to transfer himself to her body and survive, but she rigs the room to explode to completely destroy him to preserve her human cover.
Hideo Shimada
Hideo is a Parasite with a teenager’s body who decides to integrate with human society. Hideo enrolls in Shinichi’s high school on Reiko’s suggestion and expresses a desire to become friends with Shinichi, who does not trust him. Although Hideo is a relatively peaceful Parasite, he has no qualms about brutalizing or even killing bullies who try to start fights with him, and he continues to hunt humans despite claiming to be learning to eat like a person. But when Yuko uncovered his secret and confronts him about it, Hideo ends up being exposed to paint-thinner during the confrontation as Yuko manages to escape. The paint-thinner’s chemical make-up disrupts Hideo’s Parasite cells, causing him to go on an involuntary killing spree across the school. He is killed after he escapes to the roof, when Shinichi, using Migi to enhance his right arm’s strength, throws a well-aimed stone through his chest, destroying his heart.
Shimada is played by Masahiro Higashide in the film.

Manga Monday- Parasyte

Manga Monday- Parasyte

Parasyte is a science fiction horror manga series written and illustrated by Hitoshi Iwaaki, and published in Kodansha’s Afternoon magazine from 1988 to 1995. The manga was published in North America by first Tokyopop, then Del Rey, and finally Kodansha Comics.

Manga

Parasyte was originally serialized in Japan in the Morning Open Zōkan from 1988 and switched to Afternoon after a few issues in 1990. It was collected into ten tankōbon volumes by Kodansha, and was later republished in eight kanzenban volumes. It was originally licensed for English translation and North American distribution by Tokyopop, which published the series over 12 volumes. The Tokyopop version ran in Mixxzine. Daily pages from the Tokyopop version ran in the Japanimation Station, a service accessible to users of America Online. The Tokyopop English-language manga went out of print on May 2, 2005. Del Rey Manga later acquired the rights to the series, and published eight volumes following the kanzenban release. Kodansha Comics later republished the volumes in North America between 2011 and 2012.

Characters

Main characters

Shinichi Izumi 
Shinichi is the protagonist of the manga, a thoughtful, compassionate high-school boy whose hand is infected with a Parasite and is repeatedly put into difficult positions. He must find a way to peacefully coexist with Migi, the Parasite which has taken over his hand, and reconcile his desire to protect humanity from the Parasites with his desire to keep his own Parasite a secret in order to avoid being killed or used as a laboratory specimen. Like a superhero with a secret identity, he must also find a way to explain away his Parasite-fighting activities, as well as the stress and grief they cause him, to his friends and family. While originally forced to have Migi fight for him, Shinichi later gains heightened abilities when trace cells of the Parasite course through his body, and fights his own battles, with the two having an advantage in both being able to act independently and work as a team. Shinichi’s retention of his humanity, despite gradually becoming emotionally distant as a side-effect of Migi’s cells, makes most of the other Parasites deem him a threat. After defeating Gotou, with Migi deciding to “go to sleep” indefinitely afterward, Shinichi attempts to live a normal life again while having an understanding of natural order from his experience.
Masanori Harada, a 20-year-old student, wrote to the editor of the Monthly Afternoon noted that Shinichi acts calm when he is threatened and that he is “not human anymore!” Iwaaki responded, stating that Shinichi is accustomed to “close calls” partly because Migi calms Shinichi down during battle. The statement and response were printed in the April 1993 Afternoon.
Shinichi is portrayed by Shota Sometani in the film.
Migi 
Migi is the Parasite which lives in Shinichi’s right hand, named after the Japanese word for “right” ( migi). Unlike “successful” Parasites, Migi has no desire to kill humans for sustenance, and is nourished by the food Shinichi eats. Migi is, like other Parasites, completely without emotion. His primary consideration is survival, and he has threatened (and in some cases attempted) to kill other humans who pose a threat to his and Shinichi’s secrecy. When he and Shinichi were first coming to terms, he even threatened to remove Shinichi’s other limbs in order to render him unable to place the two of them in danger. Migi can be reasoned with, however, and has just as much reason to be mistrustful of other Parasites as does Shinichi. On the other hand, unlike Shinichi, Migi has no inclination to place himself at risk in order to protect other humans from Parasites. But Migi gradually evolves over the course of the series, he becomes more human while able to temporarily separate from Shinichi’s body. After the final battle with Gotou, having been absorbed by the Parasite prior to his defeat, Migi’s composition is greatly altered to the point that enters a deep sleep though he briefly woke up to save Satomi without Shinichi’s realization.
Iwaaki explained that while Migi appears to be Shinichi’s weapon, in fact Migi is in control of the battle and orders around Shinichi. Iwaaki explained that Migi is easily able to order Shinichi since Shinichi is young and “needs guidance”, while Migi would find difficulty if he became a part of a politician or a president of a company since in that scenario Migi and his host would argue a lot.
An 18-year-old from Saitama Prefecture named “Midari” asked in the letters to the editor that if Migi took Shinichi’s left hand, if he would have been named “Hidari”. Iwaaki answered that it would be Hidari, but Iwaaki felt that the name would be similar to those of Bokuzen Hidari or Tenpei Hidari and the name would “bring to mind a doddering old man, so that wouldn’t have been a good idea”. Iwaaki then said that the first man to climb Mount Everest “had a name an awful lot like that…”
Migi is voiced by Sadao Abe in the film.
Satomi Murano
Shinichi’s best friend and love interest. She is a thoughtful, tender-hearted young girl who cares deeply for her friends. While Satomi and Shinichi are mutually attracted towards one another, their relationship is strained to the breaking point when Shinichi’s life is thrown in turmoil by the Parasites.
From the moment she is introduced, Satomi is depicted as being romantically attracted towards Shinichi due to his kind and sensitive nature. Consequently, she is utterly grief-stricken as she watches him grow ever more cold and withdrawn over the course of the story. Despite her best efforts to find out the reason behind Shinichi’s behavior , Satomi becomes increasingly estranged from him as he desperately strives to keep her in the dark about Migi and the Parasite threat. As a result, she begins to question whether any trace of the gentle, caring boy she originally fell in love with remains. After losing nearly all hope, Satomi’s faith in Shinichi is restored upon witnessing him cry freely while protectively cradling Reiko’s orphaned baby in his arms. Upon learning that Shinichi is part Parasite at the end of the series, Satomi firmly proclaims this does nothing to diminish his humanity because he still regards all life as precious.
Satomi is played by Ai Hashimoto in the film.

Film Friday- JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure

Film Friday- JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure

A six-volume original video animation adaptation of the later half of the series’ third story arc was released from 1993 to 1994 by studio A.P.P.P., followed by another seven-volume series covering earlier parts of the arc from 2000 to 2002. A.P.P.P. also produced a theatrical film of the first arc in 2007. In 2012 an anime television series produced by David Production began broadcast on Tokyo MX and covered the first two-story arcs of the manga in 26 episodes. A second 48-episode season covering the third arc was broadcast in 2014 and 2015, and a 39 episode season adapting the fourth aired between April and December 2016.

Plot

JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure tells the story of the Joestar family, a family whose various members discover they are destined to take down supernatural foes using unique powers that they possess. The manga is split up into 8 unique parts, each following the story of one member of the Joestar family, who inevitably has a name that can be abbreviated to the titular “JoJo”. The first six parts of the series take place within a single continuity, while parts 7 and 8 take place in an alternate continuity.

Part 1 Phantom Blood
JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure volumes 1 to 5. In the 1880s in Great Britain, the young Jonathan Joestar meets his new adopted brother Dio Brando, who only wants to usurp Jonathan as heir to the Joestar family. However, his attempts are thwarted and he resorts to using an ancient Stone Mask which transforms him into a vampire. Jonathan, with Italian Hamon master Will A. Zeppeli and former street thug Robert E.O. Speedwagon at his side, must now find a way to stop Dio using his newly found affinity for the Ripple martial arts now that Dio’s sights are set on nothing less than world domination.
Part 2 Battle Tendency
JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure volumes 5 to 12. In New York City in 1938, Joseph Joestar, grandson of Jonathan, who has a natural affinity for the Hamon technique, becomes entangled in his grandfather’s destiny when the Pillar Men, supernatural beings of impossible power, awaken after failed experiments by Nazi German special forces. Joseph ultimately teams up with Caesar Zeppeli, Will’s grandson, and Caesar’s teacher Lisa Lisa, a woman mysteriously tied to Joseph, to stop the Pillar Men from obtaining a mystical artifact in Lisa Lisa’s possession that will grant them complete immortality and bring about the end of the world at their hands, so long as Joseph can master the Hamon technique to beat the Pillar Men in a rematch for the antidotes to poisons they implanted in his body.
Part 3 Stardust Crusaders
JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure volumes 12 to 28. In 1989, Jotaro Kujo, a Japanese high school student, places himself in jail because he believes he is possessed by an evil spirit. His mother Holly calls on her father Joseph Joestar to talk sense into Jotaro, and with the help of his ally the Egyptian fortune teller Mohammed Avdol, reveals that Jotaro has in fact developed a supernatural ability known as a Stand that has run through the family due to the revival of their ancestor’s foe Dio. After thwarting an assassination attempt by transfer student Noriaki Kakyoin who is under Dio’s thrall, Jotaro and Joseph discover that Holly is dying from her own Stand. Jotaro resolves to hunt down Dio, and Joseph leads him, Avdol, and Kakyoin to Egypt, using their Stands to battle more Stand-wielding assassins along the way, gaining allies in the French swordsman Jean Pierre Polnareff who wishes to avenge the death of his sister, and the stray dog Iggy, before 50 days elapse and Holly dies.
Part 4 Diamond Is Unbreakable
JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure volumes 29 to 47. In the fictional Japanese town of Morioh in 1999, Jotaro arrives to reveal to Josuke Higashikata that he is the illegitimate son of Joseph Joestar and to warn him that Morioh is beginning to be filled with Stand users due to a mystical Bow and Arrow that bestows Stands on those struck by the arrowheads. After Josuke takes revenge on a Stand user who killed his grandfather, he agrees to help Jotaro hunt down the holder of the Bow and Arrow, gaining allies in Josuke’s friend Koichi Hirose, who is hit by the arrow, Okuyasu Nijimura, whose brother was using the Arrow until it was stolen from him, the famous manga artist Rohan Kishibe, and even his estranged father Joseph Joestar. Along the way, the group deals with the various new Stand users throughout Morioh, including several of Josuke, Koichi, and Okuyasu’s classmates, until the death of one of their friends leads to the discovery that one of the new Stand users is the serial killer, Yoshikage Kira.
Part 5 Vento Aureo
Le Bizzarre Avventure di GioGio volumes 47 to 63. In 2001, Koichi Hirose is sent by Jotaro to Naples to investigate Giorno Giovanna, whom Jotaro has discovered is Dio’s son fathered before his defeat in Cairo 12 years earlier, to see if the boy has a Stand and if he is evil. Koichi ultimately discovers the boy’s Stand and his pure goals for reforming the mafia from the inside out, and Jotaro lets him live his life. Giorno ultimately joins a squad of Passione, a Stand-using mafia, led by Bruno Bucciarati, who leads Giorno, Leone Abbacchio, Guido Mista, Narancia Ghirga, and Pannacotta Fugo on a mission to Capri to retrieve his former superior’s riches, being attacked by rival mafioso along the way, and then are tasked by Passione’s boss to escort his daughter Trish Una throughout Italy and protect her from others in the gang who wish to use her to find out his identity.
Part 6 Stone Ocean
Stone Ocean volumes 1 to 17 (JoJo volumes 64 to 80). In 2011 near Port St. Lucie, Florida, Jolyne Cujoh is arrested and sent to the Green Dolphin St. Prison for murder. Her estranged father Jotaro visits her and reveals that she has been set up in order for one of Dio’s disciples to kill her within the prison. After revealing that a gift he gave her has awoken her latent Stand powers to protect her, he is attacked, and his Stand is stolen from him by the prison chaplain Enrico Pucci, Dio’s disciple. Jolyne works with fellow inmate Ermes Costello, who has also had a Stand awoken in her, to retrieve her father’s Stand, gaining allies in the boy Emporio Alniño, other inmates Narciso Anasui and Weather Report, and the sentient Stand-using plankton Foo Fighters to save her father and stop Pucci before he can use his Stand to recreate the universe in Dio’s image.
Part 7 Steel Ball Run
Steel Ball Run volumes 1 to 24 (JoJo volumes 81 to 104). In an alternate timeline in 1890, Gyro Zeppeli travels to the United States to take part in a cross-country horse race known as the Steel Ball Run. His skill in a mystical martial art known as Spin, which he controls with steel balls, garners the interest of former jockey turned paraplegic Johnny Joestar, particularly after a Spin-infused ball briefly restores Johnny’s ability to walk. Johnny travels with Gyro on the race to learn the art of Spin from him in hopes he can be cured, but they soon discover that the race is a ploy set up by Funny Valentine, the President of the United States, to search the country for the scattered parts of a holy corpse that imbue their holders with a Stand, so the President can use the entire corpse to his own patriotic ends, even if it means the disruption of other dimensions with his Stand’s ability. Gyro and Johnny work together, along with fellow racers Mountain Tim and Hot Pants and race organizer Stephen Steel and his wife Lucy, to stop the President from his plans, as they threaten the very world, all while dealing with Valentine’s hired assassins in the race, including the charismatic racer Diego Brando.
Part 8 JoJolion
JoJolion is currently being published, beginning with the 105th overall volume of JoJo. In 2012, in the same universe as Steel Ball Run, the town of Morioh has been devastated by the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, which has caused mysterious faults colloquially known as the “Wall Eyes” to appear in town. Local college student Yasuho Hirose is near one of the Wall Eyes when she discovers a young man buried in the rubble, and a strange bite mark on him. She nicknames him “Josuke”, as he cannot remember his own name, and after following a lead that he may be “Yoshikage Kira”, an attack by a Stand user leads them to find the real Yoshikage Kira’s corpse. Josuke is put in the care of the Higashikata family, whose patriarch Norisuke IV seems to know more about Josuke than he initially lets on, but Josuke himself discovers that the Higashikata family and Yoshikage Kira’s family are linked due to Johnny Joestar’s marriage to Rina Higashikata in the late 19th century. Josuke and Yasuho ultimately discover that Josuke is in fact Yoshikage Kira, mysteriously fused with another person, and Yoshikage Kira possessed the knowledge to cure a curse that has plagued the Higashikata family for centuries. Norisuke IV wants that knowledge back to save his grandchild from the same fate he and his family has suffered, but a mysterious race of rock men and Norisuke IV’s own son Jobin seem to be conspiring against them to both prevent Josuke from regaining his memories and from lifting the curse on the Higashikata family.

Light Novel Tuesday- JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure

Light Novel Tuesday- JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure

Several light novels based on the JoJo series have been written, each by a different author, but all including illustrations by Hirohiko Araki. The first, based on Part 3, was simply titled JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure, released on November 4, 1993, and written by Mayori Sekijima and Hiroshi Yamaguchi. Le Bizzarre Avventure di GioGio II: Golden Heart/Golden Ring written by Gichi Ōtsuka and Miya Shōtarō, was released on May 28, 2001, and based on Part 5. Both of these novels received Italian translations and releases; the first in 2003, often with the added subtitle of The Genesis of Universe, and the second in 2004.

In 2000, it was announced that Otsuichi would be writing a novel based on Part 4. The novel proved difficult to complete; in Kono Mystery ga Sugoi! 2004, Otsuichi claimed to have written over 2000 pages, but thrown them all out. Intent on writing a novel that lived up to the manga, it took him until 2007 to complete The Book: JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure 4th Another Day.

In April 2011, it was announced that Nisio Isin, Kouhei Kadono, and Ōtarō Maijō were each writing novel adaptations of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure in celebration of the series’ 25th anniversary. Kadono’s, titled Purple Haze Feedback, was released on September 16, 2011, and is based on Part 5. Isin’s was released on December 16, 2011, based on Part 3 and titled JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure Over Heaven. Maijō’s novel, Jorge Joestar, was revealed in July and released on September 19, 2012. It tells the story of George Joestar II, son of Jonathan and father of Joseph, in his childhood growing up on La Palma where he is known as “Jorge Joestar” as well as an alternate version living in Japan named “Joji Joestar” investigating mysteries behind the appearance of a moving island. It features characters from and inspired by nearly every part of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure.

Manga Monday- JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure

Manga Monday- JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure

JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Hirohiko Araki. It was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1987 to 2004 before being transferred to the monthly seinen magazine Ultra Jump in 2005. The current story arc, JoJolion, started in 2011. JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure is currently Shueisha’s second largest manga series with its chapters collected into 120 tankōbon volumes and counting.

The JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure manga has over 100 million copies in print, making it one of the best-selling manga series in history, and has spawned a large media franchise that includes several novelizations and video games, action figures, a jewelry line, and even snack foods. From 2003 to 2005, Super Techno Arts released both OVA series in North America. Viz Media released a translation of the third part of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure in North America from 2005 to 2010, but began publishing the series from the beginning in 2015.

Written and illustrated by Hirohiko Araki, JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure began serialization in Weekly Shōnen Jump in its combined issue #1-2 of 1987, which was published on January 1, 1987. The chapters are collected and published into tankōbon volumes by Shueisha, with the first released on August 10, 1987. The series is broken into arcs or parts, each of which stars a different descendant of the Joestar family. During Part 5, which takes place in Italy, the series’ title was occasionally written in Italian as Le Bizzarre Avventure di GioGio. After volume 63, each parts’ tankōbon have started the number count back at one; see Stone Ocean, Steel Ball Run and JoJolion. The series was switched to the magazine Ultra Jump in 2005, during Steel Ball Run, with the chapters now published monthly. JoJolion, the current arc, began on May 19, 2011. A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published in October 2012. That same year, the first three Parts of the series were digitally colored and released as digital downloads for smartphones and tablet computers. A hardcover re-release of the first three Parts, including colored pages from their original serialization, was collected under the title JoJonium between December 4, 2013, and March 4, 2015.

Araki makes frequent references to real-life musicians and fashion designers in the series, causing its English publisher to take stricter legal precautions than usual.

In the early 1990s Viz Media had planned to release an English-language version of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure in North America as “The Strange Adventures of Jojo“, evident by an advertisement in their newsletter at the time, Viz-In. It is suspected the plans were canned after Baoh, another series by Hirohiko Araki, sold poorly. The series was brought up again for talks in 2002, for release as individual monthly chapters. However, by this time, that publication format for manga was becoming less popular in North America.

JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure finally received a North American release in 2005, in the graphic novel format, similar to its Japanese tankōbon. However, it is only of the series’ third part, Stardust Crusaders, which is the most popular and well-known. Originally published bimonthly, the volumes were later reduced to a quarterly release. The first volume was released on November 8, 2005, and the last on December 7, 2010. Viz’s release changed the names of several characters due to copyright concerns and included some censorship, with scenes of animal violence redrawn by Araki himself. JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure has also seen domestic releases in Italy by Star Comics, in France by J’ai Lu and Tonkam, Taiwan by Da Ran Culture Enterprise and Tong Li Publishing, and in Malaysia by Comics House.

In 2013, Viz revealed that they planned to release the third part digitally and expressed interest in further material of the series, however, they explained the difficulties due to the numerous blatant references to real-life musicians and fashion designers. Viz Media began publishing the JoJonium edition of Phantom Blood digitally in September 2014, with a three-volume hardcover print edition that includes color pages following throughout 2015. They then licensed the four-volume part 2 Battle Tendency, which they began publishing digitally in March 2015 and in print in November 2015. Viz began re-releasing Stardust Crusaders in the hardcover format in fall 2016. At Anime Expo 2016, Viz Media announced they will be publishing part 4 Diamond is Unbreakable.